What you should NEVER do on Australia Day

Spread the love


Social media influencers are taking to their platforms to share tips on how young people can support First Nations people on Australia Day – and which activities revelers should avoid.

January 26 – marking the raising of the British flag on Australian soil in 1788 following the arrival of the First Fleet in Sydney Harbor – is regarded by many First Nations people as “Invasion Day”.

In viral videos, popular YouTubers have created “tutorials” that offer advice to their thousands of followers on how to approach the day with cultural sensitivity.

Her suggestions include turning down Australia Day party invitations and donating wages to charity if you have to work on the day.

Wiradjuri, Gomeroi and Awabakal user Meissa Mason (pictured) has suggested people working on Invasion Day who want to support Indigenous people donate their holiday bonus fares

Wiradjuri, Gomeroi and Awabakal user Meissa Mason (pictured) has suggested people working on Invasion Day who want to support Indigenous people donate their holiday bonus fares

Wiradjuri, Gomeroi and Awabakal user Meissa Mason, who has more than 110,000 followers, encouraged those working on Australia Day to donate their extra income to charity.

‘A couple of people have sent me a DM saying they don’t celebrate Invasion Day and would rather work, but they also feel uncomfortable about cashing in on Invasion Day by getting one and a half or double installments,’ she said.

“Something you can do is work out your payslips to see what you got from your regular rates and then take the percentage you got for double or one and a half salaries and give it to an indigenous organization , movement or group donation .

“This way you are not benefiting from Invasion Day and are directly supporting the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.”

Barkindji, Wakawaka and Birrigubba Tiktok influencer Emily Johnson shared a “tutorial” titled “Don’t Be Proud of Genocide” in which she showed her 78,000 followers how to decline invitations to events around the holiday.

“Personally, it’s fine for me if you want to enjoy the holiday, but calling your event ‘Invasion Day’ is just plain stupid,” she wrote in a caption.

Non-Indigenous activist Ella Jae offered her 60,200 followers a “reminder” that we should not “celebrate genocide” and called for the date to be moved from January 26 to May 8.

Barkindji, Wakawaka and Birrigubba Tiktok influencer Emily Johnson (pictured) shared a tutorial on how to decline Australia Day party invites

She said:

Barkindji, Wakawaka and Birrigubba Tiktok influencer Emily Johnson (pictured) shared a tutorial on how to decline Australia Day party invites

“If we’re going to celebrate Australia, it should be on an inclusive day so everyone can have fun,” she said in the video, which has been viewed more than 100,000 times.

She compared an Australia Day party to skipping a loved one’s funeral and going straight to Kick Ons, and refuted atrocities against Indigenous Peoples that “happened so long ago”.

“The trauma is haunted for generations, that pain is still felt by the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the First Nation,” she said.

“And second, you can’t decide what’s offensive or hurtful to a community that you don’t belong to.

“If you choose to be ignorant and uneducated, you are part of the problem.”

Date change advocate Jaz Karati described how she and her Maori family used to celebrate the holiday until they learned of its cultural significance.

“When we first moved here 10 years ago we didn’t know anything about the history of that date so we celebrated with a lot of our Aussie friends,” she said.

Ella Jae (pictured) explained that trauma can be passed down through the generations - and celebrating January 26 is not ethical

Ella Jae (pictured) explained that trauma can be passed down through the generations – and celebrating January 26 is not ethical

Jaz Karati, a self-proclaimed Aboriginal ally, admitted that she used to celebrate Australia Day until she realized the historical and cultural significance of the date

Jaz Karati, a self-proclaimed Aboriginal ally, admitted that she used to celebrate Australia Day until she realized the historical and cultural significance of the date

“Once we learned the real story and why this date is so important to Aboriginal people, it was natural for us to stop celebrating.”

Ms Karati said white Australian friends justified celebrating the holiday as being “not racist” as they “don’t hate the indigenous people”.

“I said, ‘You’re wrong. You think racism is rooted in hate, but it’s not.

“If you care about Aboriginal people you would not celebrate invasion, genocide, rape, murder and colonization.

Comedian Tilly Langford, a woman from Gumbaynggir, frequently shares content with her more than 38,600 TikTok followers and champions a range of social justice causes, including class inequality, sexism and racial injustice.

The political commentator said the national holiday represents for her the ongoing differences between Indigenous Australians and other members of the community.

“The day of the invasion symbolizes for me a lot of my personal conflicts with ‘Australia,’” she told News.com.au.

“I want to love this country. I want to care for and appreciate it like my ancestors. But I can’t because of the way it is now, the blood and carnage and sheer indifference.’

Comedian and Gumbaynggir wife Tilly Langford (pictured) says she

Comedian and Gumbaynggir wife Tilly Langford (pictured) says she “can’t love Australia” because of ongoing racial injustice and the brutal history of colonization.

In an Instagram post on Wednesday, she sent strength to fellow Indigenous Australians

In an Instagram post on Wednesday, she sent strength to fellow Indigenous Australians

Australia Day, held on the day British Royal Navy ships hoisted a Union Jack, called a Warrane by the Aboriginal people who fished and lived there, at Sydney Cove, remains divisive between young and older generations.

In recent years, the day has been marked by widespread protests in cities across the country as thousands of Indigenous supporters mourn the culture’s painful history and call for the holiday to be postponed.

A recent survey by Core Data found “a generational and gender gap among Australians in relation to the importance of the day and its position on the calendar”.

The research advisory asked if people wanted to celebrate, if they supported moving the holiday to a different date, and how their opinions had changed in recent years.

Overall, 54 per cent of respondents said they celebrate the occasion, 30 per cent said they celebrate Australia’s history and achievements and 15 per cent said ‘just because it was a public holiday’.

More than two-thirds of respondents under the age of 26 say they will not celebrate on January 26, with just over 30 percent saying they will.

But more than 80 percent of them support moving the date to improve relations with indigenous people, as do more than 70 percent of 27- to 41-year-olds.

Support for a change declined among older respondents, with just over 30 percent of those aged 56 to 75 and 25 percent of those aged 55 or older favoring changing the date.

People carry placards as thousands of people take part in the Australia Day protest in Melbourne January 26, 2021

People carry placards as thousands of people take part in the Australia Day protest in Melbourne January 26, 2021

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11669223/What-NEVER-Australia-Day.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 What you should NEVER do on Australia Day



Source link