With dreams of Mars, this young activist works for a greener future on Earth | CNN

Spread the love



In 2015, Kazumi Muraki created Hiyassy, an AI carbon capture device the size of carry-on luggage.

Japanese scientist Kazumi Muraki created a small carbon capture device when he was just 15 years old. Today, he’s researching how to convert that captured carbon into fuel.

When he was just 15, Kazumi Muraki created a small, portable device to capture carbon from the atmosphere..solar-powered rover’s last message to mission control translated to this:”My battery is low and it’s getting dark.percholorate (a combination of chlorine and oxygen) that formed as a briny water that percolated through red Martian rock.

Seven years later, the Japanese chemist is researching how to convert this captured carbon into fuel. As a young boy, Muraki was never very interested in science, he tells CNN, until his grandfather gave him the children’s novel “George’s Secret Key to the Universe,” by the late Stephen Hawking and his daughter Lucy. Muraki says the titular character goes on a quest to find a suitable planet for human life and settles on Mars. The film shines a light on the hope of space exploration and captures the emotional attachment between humans and the robotic ambassadors that explore on our behalf. Amazed by pictures of the red planet and its blue sunset, at just 10-years-old Muraki made it his life mission to get to Mars. From then on, he says, he started researching what it would take to live there. ] To get an idea of when this last gasp of Water on Mars occurred, scientists will have to examine samples in the lab.

“I found that (the) Martian atmosphere is (made) of 95% of carbon dioxide,” which is lethal to humans. “Even though the spacecraft was robotic, the mission was human,” said Doug Ellison, engineering camera team lead for the Curiosity Rover at JPL, who also worked on Opportunity’s mission. He adds, “if we want to live on Mars, we have to remove Martian carbon dioxide.” He realized his research to remove carbon from Mars’ atmosphere could also be helpful here on Earth. “Carbon dioxide is the main cause of the climate crisis,” he says, adding that removing it from the air is one way to curb it. Spirit was stubborn and struggled through the same tests that Opportunity breezed through. In 2015, Muraki created Hiyassy, an AI carbon capture device the size of carry-on luggage. Perseverance is looking at the delta’s sedimentary rocks, which formed when particles of various sizes settled in the once-watery river.

It’s intended for home and office use, so that anyone can help stop global warming from anywhere, he says. Hiyassy works by pulling in air and filtering it through an alkaline solution before releasing it back out. Both launched in 2003 inside protective shells aboard Delta rockets and landed in 2004 on opposite sides of the red planet. Now, he’s onto the next stage of research: carbon recycling. His Tokyo-based company, Carbon Recovering Research Agency, is working to make an alternative fuel from captured carbon. “We are now creating a diesel fuel from carbon dioxide,” he says, adding that it could be available in the next year or so. The view is presented in false color to make some differences between materials easier to see.

In the meantime, he’s still dreaming about the red planet: “I want to be the first man (to) land on Mars.” To learn more about his inventions, watch the video above. . There was hope for both rovers to”wake up” until the bitter end.

Read more:
CNN »

Who should you root for at the FIFA World Cup?

My New Favorite Futbolista will introduce you to the World Cup’s most inspiring soccer players and the causes they champion. New episodes hosted by former Colombian striker Juan Pablo Ángel and LX News host Eric Alvarez will drop November 1 in English and Spanish. Watch the trailer HERE. Read more >>

Well thats for sure setting off the x-ray machine

Mars Exploration RoversHere’s to you, Oppy. 🥂 Before you say GoodNightOppy, learn more about our Opportunity NASA Mars rover, and how a planned 90-day mission turned into a 15-year journey of exploration and discovery: Mars Thank you so much 💐 Mars It was only supposed to be a three hour cruise Mars

‘It’s getting dark’: ‘Good Night, Oppy’ recounts the sudden death of a Mars rover’Good Night, Oppy,’ available to stream on Amazon Prime on November 23, traces the journey of twin Mars rovers Opportunity and Spirit and the people at mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, who dedicated their lives to them. Great! Tell Americans about their border crises.

Signs of past chemical reactions detected on MarsThe Perseverance rover landed in the Jezero crater in 2021 and has already found some clues to the planet’s past.

Mars rover digs up intriguing clues in the hunt for life beyond EarthNASA’s Perseverance mission has collected samples that hold life-friendly molecules “in pretty much every rock” — as well as a few geologic surprises Wapo will be pushing for legalized abortion of Mars lifeforms in the coming months

Mars rover documentary ‘Good Night Oppy’ now streaming on Prime Video’Good Night Oppy’ finally arrives on Amazon’s Prime Video streaming service on Wednesday (Nov. 23), just in time for holiday viewing over the long Thanksgiving Day weekend. En esa bajada dió la vuelta y seguro que tuvieron que ir a ponerlo derecho para la foto. Loved it , made me cry But can’t get any streaming from the dark side of the moon yea ok

Dick Briefer’s Inventive Take on Rex Dexter of Mars, Up for AuctionICYMI: Dick Briefer’s Rex Dexter of Mars may draw inspiration from a pair of All-American Comics sagas, which he takes in weird directions. Mars sponsored

When he was just 15, Kazumi Muraki created a small, portable device to capture carbon from the atmosphere..solar-powered rover’s last message to mission control translated to this:”My battery is low and it’s getting dark.percholorate (a combination of chlorine and oxygen) that formed as a briny water that percolated through red Martian rock.

Seven years later, the Japanese chemist is researching how to convert this captured carbon into fuel. As a young boy, Muraki was never very interested in science, he tells CNN, until his grandfather gave him the children’s novel “George’s Secret Key to the Universe,” by the late Stephen Hawking and his daughter Lucy. Muraki says the titular character goes on a quest to find a suitable planet for human life and settles on Mars. The film shines a light on the hope of space exploration and captures the emotional attachment between humans and the robotic ambassadors that explore on our behalf. Amazed by pictures of the red planet and its blue sunset, at just 10-years-old Muraki made it his life mission to get to Mars. From then on, he says, he started researching what it would take to live there. ] To get an idea of when this last gasp of Water on Mars occurred, scientists will have to examine samples in the lab.

“I found that (the) Martian atmosphere is (made) of 95% of carbon dioxide,” which is lethal to humans. “Even though the spacecraft was robotic, the mission was human,” said Doug Ellison, engineering camera team lead for the Curiosity Rover at JPL, who also worked on Opportunity’s mission. He adds, “if we want to live on Mars, we have to remove Martian carbon dioxide.” He realized his research to remove carbon from Mars’ atmosphere could also be helpful here on Earth. “Carbon dioxide is the main cause of the climate crisis,” he says, adding that removing it from the air is one way to curb it. Spirit was stubborn and struggled through the same tests that Opportunity breezed through. In 2015, Muraki created Hiyassy, an AI carbon capture device the size of carry-on luggage. Perseverance is looking at the delta’s sedimentary rocks, which formed when particles of various sizes settled in the once-watery river.

It’s intended for home and office use, so that anyone can help stop global warming from anywhere, he says. Hiyassy works by pulling in air and filtering it through an alkaline solution before releasing it back out. Both launched in 2003 inside protective shells aboard Delta rockets and landed in 2004 on opposite sides of the red planet. Now, he’s onto the next stage of research: carbon recycling. His Tokyo-based company, Carbon Recovering Research Agency, is working to make an alternative fuel from captured carbon. “We are now creating a diesel fuel from carbon dioxide,” he says, adding that it could be available in the next year or so. The view is presented in false color to make some differences between materials easier to see.

In the meantime, he’s still dreaming about the red planet: “I want to be the first man (to) land on Mars.” To learn more about his inventions, watch the video above. . There was hope for both rovers to”wake up” until the bitter end.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *